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This book presents a detailed explanation of the classical Islamic concept of God’s unity as it relates to faith and acts of religious devotion. It also discusses the major areas within which the Islamic unitarian belief (Tawheed) is either nullified or compromised by idolatrous concepts and practises, collectively called Shirk.

 



This book outlines the basic Islamic concepts in child education. The author has tried to coordiante the main ideas, as well as the basics precepts for raising Muslim children in all the different spheres of life. First of all, the importance of correct belief and faith cannot be inculcated in young children except through the teaching and example of their parents; and obviously, the role of the mature and religious mother is foremost. This state of harmony can only be achieved when matrimonial relations are relatively stable. Care is to be taken in providing young children with all the necessary elements in the fields of ethical, physical and psychological education. This cannot be overemphasized. It is established that the common ailments of human societies, personal as well as social, find their remedy in monotheism and justice. Therefore, emphasis on these two moral principles is essential. Muslim children must develop a clear understanding of the concept of the oneness of Allah, mainly through the performance of devotional acts of worship, to Him, and through developing a sense of justice in all personnel and social dealings. The author has briefly outlined these glorious concepts in this book. Through his deep understanding of Islam, and his eminent conviction and personal adherence to its glorious principles, he introduces this book to the readers, with all practical instructions, with the intention of helping to build up a Muslim nation, worthily to uphold the honorable tenets of the Glorious Qur’an and Sunnah.

 



The general understanding in Islam regarding Sunnah, is that if the Prophet or any of his wives (RA) or companions (RA) are recorded in authentic hadith to have engaged in an act that is not haram (prohibited) as defined by Qur’an or Sunnah, then the act is declared halal (permissible). If the companions engaged in an act that the Prophet was aware of and did not speak out against, it is halal.

It is well-known that the wives of the Prophet covered their faces any time non-mahram men were near. A woman named Asma, who was not a wife of the Prophet , was also recorded as covering her face. Easily, one can conclude that wearing veil is halal (permissible).

However, Muslims and Muslimahs across the world have been in “hot debate” for centuries, over the issue of whether or not covering the face is obligatory upon a Muslimah. Those who argue that it is not required, point to the use of the word khimar in the Qur’an, and explain that today’s modern khimar does not cover the face, and argue that khimar has never referred to the covering of the face, but only to that of the hair, neck, and bosoms. While one cannot deny the support of Hadith that indicate that the Prophet’s wives wore khimar, one must realize that they also covered their faces at all times in the presence of non-mahram men.

The group of scholars agree that it is a highly recommended act to cover the face. The scholars also agree that a woman must cover her adornment, yet some scholars argue that this does not include the face.

 



The inimitable Ahmed Deedat here poses the question, “What is the name of God?” Using christian, jewish and Islamic sources, he strives to answer the question.

 



This Book is extracted from the Book of Imam Ibn Kathir “Al-Bidayah Wan-Nihayah” one of the most important texts written about the History of the World until the time of the author. The Stories of the Prophets are not included in this Volume as they have already been Published under a different Cover also Some Stories As with many Translation of Ibn Kathirs Works this is an Abridge version without impairing the contents of the book.

 



A summarised text detailing the rules governing the Criticism of Hadeeth. From its introduction -‘A hadith (pl. ahadith) is composed of two parts: the matn (text) and the isnad (chain of reporters). A text may seem to be logical and reasonable but it needs an authentic isnad with reliable reporters to be acceptable; ‘Abdullah b. al-Mubarak (d. 181 AH) is reported to have said, “The isnad is part of the religion: had it not been for the isnad, whoever wished to would have said whatever he liked.” During the lifetime of the Prophet (SAS) and after his death, his Companions (Sahabah) used to refer to him when quoting his sayings. The Successors (Tabi’un) followed suit; some of them used to quote the Prophet (SAS) through the Companions while others would omit the intermediate authority – such a hadith was known as mursal (loose). It was found that the missing link between the Successor and the Prophet (SAS) might be one person, i.e. a Companion, or two persons, the extra person being an older Successor who heard the hadith from the Companion.’

 



Extract from book, ‘Purity (Tahârah) is a beautiful word that is pleasing to the ears, and it is a quality which everyone strives to maintain. From an Islamic perspective, purity is a word which is general in its mean-ing. It may mean physical cleanness, which is purity (of the body) from impure substances or states of impurity, or it may mean spiritual purity, which is the purity of one’s self from vices, faults, sins, and replacing them with good deeds, whether in speech or deeds.

 



This is the first volume in a series entitled ‘Stories of the Sahabah’ adapted by the author. This volume contains the biographies of twenty-one Sahabah who were promised paradise, as recorded in the ahadith. This series presents the lives of the Sahabah for younger generations of Muslims through rich and engaging stories.

 



Short Description: The prescribed book for the course is Subulus-Salaam by the 17th century Yemenite scholar Muhammad ibn Ismaa‘eel as-San‘aanee which is a commentary on Buloogh al-Maraam written by Haafiz Ibn Hajar al- ‘Asqalaanee. In Buloogh the author gathered the majority of the hadeeths which are commonly used as the basic evidences for the Islamic legal system. The course material is comprised of the Chapter on Fasting (Kitaab as-Siyaam) from Subulus-Salaam.

 



Comparative Religion – Religion is Instinctive, Mental, Happiness but Which One?…..by Sh. Dr. Mohammad Hawarey