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This paper is an analysis of chapter 23 verses 12 to 14 of the Qur’an in light of modern embryology. This study will provide a linguistic breakdown of the relevant verses and correlate these linguistic items to modern science. To ensure a comprehensive understanding of this study, an overview of qur’anic exegesis will be provided to appreciate how the Qur’an is made accessible and intelligible to the reader. This study will also address various contentions, which attempt to challenge the credibility of the qur’anic discourse and its concurrence with modern embryology. Among these responses will be a refutation of both the ancient Greek plagiarisation thesis and the accusation that al-Harith bin Kalada, a 7th century physician, was the source of the Prophet’s medical knowledge.



The origin of Islamic law and its evolution and the four schools of law (math-habs) are discussed in this work along with the reasons for differences among them. This is probably Bilal Philips best-selling work on the various schools of thought in Islam, including detailed facts, insight, and commentary on the four major madhabs as well as other, less-known madhabs in Islam. Includes mini-biographies on various eminent Islamic scholars the Evolution of Fiqh (Islamic Law & the Madh-habs), the author very clearly presents a brief overview of the historical development of Islamic law and its schools (the Madh-Nabs). The book identifies the main reason for the appearance of the Madh-habs and the factors leading to differences among them. For those to whom the Madh-habs have been a mystery, this aspect of the book will he extremely enlightening. Although the author sheds light on both the positive and negative roles of the Madh-habs in the past, the main message of the book is call to the understanding the differences (with an aim to remove them where possible)



The Prophet Muhammad, upon him be peace, is the most excellent example as father and husband. He was very kind and tolerant towards his wives. They could not envisage life, without him.. He was the perfect head of family, managing many women with ease, being a lover of their hearts, an instructor of their minds, an educator of their souls, he never neglected the affairs of the nation nor compromised his duties. The Prophet’s beloved wife, Aa’isha, said of her noble husband: ‘ He always helped with the housework and would at times mend his clothes, repair his shoes and sweep the floor. He would milk, protect and feed his animals and do household chores’ Not only was he a devoted husband, he also encouraged his companions to follow his example: ‘The most perfect of the believers in faith are the best of them in morals. And the best among them are those who are best to their wives.’



The Guidance of Muhammad (Blessings and Peace Be Upon Him) Concerning Worship, Dealings and Manners… 30 Examples from the Life of the Prophet (pbuh) Selected from the book Zadul-Maad by Imam Ibn Al-Qayyim… by: Dr. Ahmad bin Uthman al-Mazyad, Professor of Creed and Contemporary Doctrines, Faculty of Education – King Saud University.



This brief treatise outlines ways of increasing ones provision from Allah (swt) according to Quran and Sunnah.



In the month of Ramadan of the year eight hundred and ninety-nine [June, 1494], I became King of Farghdna.’ Such are the opening words of the celebrated Memoirs of Barbar, first of the ‘Moghul’ Emperors of Hindistan. Babar is the link between Central Asia and India, between predatory hordes and imperial government, between Tamerlane and Akbar. The blood of the two great Scourges of Asia, Chingiz and Timur, mixed in his veins, and to the daring and restlessness of the nomad Tatar he joined the culture and urbanity of the Persian. He brought the energy of the Mongol the courage and capacity of the Turk, to the listless Hindu ; and, himself a soldier of fortune and no architect of empire, he yet laid the first stone of the splendid fabric which his grand- son Akbar achieved.



On April 4, 1872, ‘Abdullah Yusuf ‘Ali was born in  a family of the Bohra community in Surat, India. His father, a merchant, was a very religious man who made sure that his son learned Qur’an before anything else. Upon the completion of young ‘Abdullah’s committing the entire Qur’an to memory, his father celebrated the occasion with a grand banquet, thus showing to his son the importance of his achievement and the importance of the Qur’an. In addition to studying  contemporary knowledge at school, ‘Abdullah continued to receive lessons in Arabic language and never ceased in his studies of the Qur’an. He was a superior student who excelled in academic achievement and won the much coveted Indian Civil Service Award, a prestigious honor resulting from the extremely competitive entrance examinations for high positions in the Indian Civil Service which wealthy families would aspire for their sons to receive. ‘Abdullah was easily able to absorb English literature and was considered to be among the best of his fellow countrymen in writing English. Many of the most well-known scholarly magazines in India published his works and expressed their appreciation for his beautiful literary style. Later, ‘Abdullah Yusuf  ‘Ali left India for Europe and visited many European capitals and eventually resided in London for a considerable period of time.



The Fiqh of Minorities – the New Fiqh to Subvert Islam by Asif K Khan



The method to re-establish the Khilafah by Members of Hizb ut-Tahrir in Britain



This book gives a clear explanation of the Muslim sound Creed which is the core of the religion of Islam, as the belief in Tawheed (monotheism) is the purpose for which Allah created both mankind and jinn, and thus, those whoes belief in Tawhid is corrupt, are not considered Muslims. It is a commentary on the Book of Tawhid written by Shaykh Muhammad Ibn Abdul Wahhab.