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‘Where did I come from, and where am I going? is the question on every child’s lips at some stage. What is the relationship between man, life and the universe? What is the link between life and what was before life, and what is after life? These are all the most natural of questions which man wants an answer to, and indeed needs an answer to, to form a basis for all actions. Without an answer, we are simply running with a limited view of life, i.e. what is here and now with no regard to the past and future. Such a view of life is comparable to applying for a job without asking the interviewer what the history of the company is, who they will be working for, why the previous person left, what the job is, how the job is likely to develop, what the prospects for promotion are and so on. To simply ask for the job without any reference to the past and the future and how they are related is superficial and naive.’

 



These inspirational accounts are of those Companions who were at first unreceptive to Islam, and how their beings were transformed when Allah opened their hearts to the message. Stories include those of Abu Hurayrah, Abu Sufyan, Tufail ibn Amr and many more.

 



The following text is an edited translation of a summary of ar-Radd al-Mufhim by Shaykh Naasiruddeen al-Albaanee found in pages 5-20 of the introduction of his book Jilbaab al- Mar’ah al-Muslimah, 3rd edition, 1996, al-Maktabah al-Islaamiyyah.

 



THE history of Spain offers us a melancholy contrast. Twelve hundred years ago, Tarik the Moor added the land of the Visigoths to the long catalogue of kingdoms subdued by the Moslems. For nearly eight centuries, under her Mohammedan rulers, Spain set to all Europe a shining example of a civilized and enlightened State. Her fertile provinces, rendered doubly prolific by the industry and engineering skill of her conquerors, bore fruit an hundredfold. Cities innumerable sprang up in the rich valleys of the Guadelquivir and the Guadiana, whose names, and names only, still commemorate the vanished glories of their past. Art, literature, and science prospered, as they then prospered nowhere else in Europe. Students flocked from France and Germany and England to drink from the fountain of learning which flowed only in the cities of the Moors. The surgeons and doctors of Andalusia were in the van of science : women were encouraged to devote themselves to serious study, and the lady doctor was not unknown among the people of Cordova.

 



In recent times, many sincere Muslims have looked to ascertain the situation of our Nation, and what they see were the effects of the Devil (Shaytan), the blackness of wicked deeds, and the blood of many wounds. They saw discord, disagreement, disunity, confusion, and anxiety. They perceived the evil results of not ruling according to Allah’s Book – in the home, the streets, or the marketplace. They saw these results in schools, universities, books, newspapers, and the media; in fact, they even witnessed them in the best places, mosques, where innovations now flourish. And they have also seen the effects of that evil among the ranks of callers to Islam and students of knowledge.

 



Prologue. The social culture in which children are raised is the primary determinant of whether they will succeed as adults.

 



It is important to understand Islaam from a cultural point of view because the basis of much of the current turmoil within Muslim countries and conflict with their neighbors can be attributed to cultural clashes. Consequently, a clear understanding of culture and its derivatives is necessary to comprehend the relevance of Islaam to the civilization of Muslim peoples in the twentieth century and beyond. The word “culture” comes from the Latin cultura which is a derivative of the verb colere meaning “tending” or “cultivation.” It was first recorded in the Oxford Dictionary of English in 1510 as meaning: “training of the mind” or “manners.” However, culture in anthropological usage, may be defined as “the way of life of specific group.”

 



The subject of rights and duties of women in Islam has often been clouded by controversy, personal opinions and sheer ignorance. Although many scholars have dealt with this subject, there has remained a need to discuss wider aspects of the issue. The purpose of this booklet is to remove some of the misunderstandings, prejudiced opinions and false hoods which circulate about the Rights and Duties of Women in Islam.

 



This book is a translation of the al-Balashuri’s “Futuh al-Buldan”. who is considered one of Islams pre eminant Historians. Al Baladhuri was one of the cheif authorities for the period during which the Arab state was in process of formation. This is an important non orientalist work, and al Balashuri uses chains of narration in his work, so that the source is very much part of this historic work. The book covers the formation of the Arabic State , from Medina to the Maghreb, to Andalusia, Persia, Sicily, Rhodes and Crete by the Early Arabs.

 



This is a brief booklet which describes the Prophet’s prayer and is presented to all Muslims so that they may strive hard to imitate him when performing their Prayers, for he (Peace be upon him) said: “Perform your Prayers as you have seen me performing them” (Reported by Sahih Al Bukhari)