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The story of Yusuf (AS) opens the door to many sub-topics buried within the Sura: insight into dreams and interpretations, slavery, kinship & other topics brought to the reader. A detailed commentary & narration by Shaykh Abdur Raheem, UK.



Architectural presentation of the legacy of Islam in Andulisia. Including details of the great mosque in Cordoba and also architectural gems from Seville. The book also includes a historical account of the Muslim presence in SpainTHE inception of my work on The Alhambra, to which this book is designed to be the companion and complementary volume, was due to the disappointing discovery that no such thing as an even moderately adequate souvenir of the Red Palace of Granada, “that glorious sanctuary of Spain,” was in existence. It was written at a time when I shared the very common delusion that the Alhambra was the only word in a vocabulary of relics which includes such Arabian superlatives as the Mos que at Cordova, the Gates and the Cristo de la Luz of Toledo, and the Alcaza r at Seville . I had then to learn that while the Alhambra has rightly been accepted as the last word on Moorish Art in Spain, it must not be regarded as the solitary monument of the splendour and beauty with which the Arabs stamped their virile and artistic personality upon Andalus.



Prophet Muhammad’s letters to Emperor Heraclius, Chosroes II, Muqawqis, Negus, Governor of Syria and Ruler of Bahrain.



That was `Omar ibnul-Khattab, the man of extraordinary strenght, height, broadshoulderedness thickness of hands and feet; the man who forced the people to listen when he spoke, who always hastened away when he walked, and who usually caused much pain when he struck. That was `Omar who never felt scared of anything or anybody throughout his life. It was not strange to see him facing the first Muslims with all the violence and ruthlessness he had. There was a strong enmity between him and Islam; the reason for this was that, among his people, he had been a man full of power prudence zeal and dignity power to defend his people and their beliefs; prudence to be always having watchful care of their interests; zeal to spend his time and effort to keep them in union; and dignity to provide full respect and prestige for himself and his people always and everywhere. With all these honourable qualities, ‘Omar had had to face any call that might have caused disunion among his people, dispersing them, nullifying their aspirations condemning their beliefs and satirizing their gods. No wonder, then, that `Omar’s violence inflicted the severest persecution and torture upon the first Muslims. We have seen how he had inherited so much of his father’s brutal and violent nature. If we bear in mind that the most brutal and merciless enemy of Islam, its Prophet and its first adherents, was `Amr ibn-Hisham, after wards named “Abu-Jahl” by the Prophet and his companions, was `Omar’s uncle (his mother’s brother), we can easily discern that `Omar’s violence was the outcome of what he had inherited from his father, and of the hideous ruthlessness his uncle used to inflict upon the poor and weak Muslims of his time.



This book is an adaption of a friday khutbah given by Shaykh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid which explains the fruits that can be taken from the life of Prophet Yusuf (may Allah be pleased with him). This chapter Yusuf relates to the story of one of the noble prophets, peace be upon him, and includes great admonitions and numerous benefits for the believers, as well as Islamic rulings which the scholars of Islam have extracted from this wonderful story that Allah revealed to His Prophet Muhammad sallallaahu ‘alayhi wa sallam. The story of Prophet Yusuf, peace be upon him, has a distinct, beautiful style, and neither the Jews nor the Christians have anything like it in their books, especially in such detail.

 



THE history of Spain offers us a melancholy contrast. Twelve hundred years ago, Tarik the Moor added the land of the Visigoths to the long catalogue of kingdoms subdued by the Moslems. For nearly eight centuries, under her Mohammedan rulers, Spain set to all Europe a shining example of a civilized and enlightened State. Her fertile provinces, rendered doubly prolific by the industry and engineering skill of her conquerors, bore fruit an hundredfold. Cities innumerable sprang up in the rich valleys of the Guadelquivir and the Guadiana, whose names, and names only, still commemorate the vanished glories of their past. Art, literature, and science prospered, as they then prospered nowhere else in Europe. Students flocked from France and Germany and England to drink from the fountain of learning which flowed only in the cities of the Moors. The surgeons and doctors of Andalusia were in the van of science : women were encouraged to devote themselves to serious study, and the lady doctor was not unknown among the people of Cordova.



By The Imam, the Hafidh Abu Hafs ‘Umar bin ‘Ali al-Bazzar. Translated By Abu Sabaayaa. “If I had to swear standing between the corner of the Ka’bah and the spot of Ibrahim, I would swear that I have not laid my two eyes on anyone like him, nor has he seen anyone as knowledgeable as himself.” – al-Hafidh adh-Dhahabi
The author said: “…When I learned of the death of the scholar and educator of this Ummah – the Imam, the mujtahid, the defender of the pure Shari’ah and Prophetic Sunnah, Shaykh al-Islam Taqi ad-Din Abi al-‘Abbas Ahmad bin ‘Abd al-Halim bin ‘Abd as-Salam bin Taymiyyah (may Allah sanctify his soul and brighten his grave) – some of the scholars and those who loved good for the Muslims said to me: “You saw and befriended the Shaykh, and you came to know him and his characteristics. If only you could write a few words regarding what you saw in order to benefit whoever of this Ummah comes across them, since mercy descends when we remember the righteous people.”
So, I responded: “I only accompanied him for a few days, and I only know few of this many virtues.” However, I saw that they intended good and that what they were requesting of me was a right and obligation upon me, as the scholar should be keen to spread and distribute what he thinks will be of value to the Muslims. So, I produced a small effort describing his virtues which will give the intelligent reader an idea of the honor and excellence of this man. I divided it into sections in order that it be a guide to those who reflect, and I included all that I could remember under each one…”



In this brief, indispensable guide, Irwin introduces the stunning Moorish palace and fortress complex, revealing its mysteries, myths and significance with wit and insight. He opens with a romantic description of the fairytale structure, which he then deliciously demolishes. Includes a detailed floor plan, sketches and aerial photographs.



The Autobiography of Malcolm X (ISBN 0-345-35068-5) was written by Alex Haley between 1964 and 1965, as told to him through conversations with Malcolm conducted shortly before Malcolm X’s death (and with an epilogue after it), and published in 1965. The book was named by Time magazine as one of the ten most important nonfiction books of the 20th century.



This book is a translation of the al-Balashuri’s “Futuh al-Buldan”. who is considered one of Islams pre eminant Historians. Al Baladhuri was one of the cheif authorities for the period during which the Arab state was in process of formation. This is an important non orientalist work, and al Balashuri uses chains of narration in his work, so that the source is very much part of this historic work. The book covers the formation of the Arabic State , from Medina to the Maghreb, to Andalusia, Persia, Sicily, Rhodes and Crete by the Early Arabs.