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The general understanding in Islam regarding Sunnah, is that if the Prophet or any of his wives (RA) or companions (RA) are recorded in authentic hadith to have engaged in an act that is not haram (prohibited) as defined by Qur’an or Sunnah, then the act is declared halal (permissible). If the companions engaged in an act that the Prophet was aware of and did not speak out against, it is halal.

It is well-known that the wives of the Prophet covered their faces any time non-mahram men were near. A woman named Asma, who was not a wife of the Prophet , was also recorded as covering her face. Easily, one can conclude that wearing veil is halal (permissible).

However, Muslims and Muslimahs across the world have been in “hot debate” for centuries, over the issue of whether or not covering the face is obligatory upon a Muslimah. Those who argue that it is not required, point to the use of the word khimar in the Qur’an, and explain that today’s modern khimar does not cover the face, and argue that khimar has never referred to the covering of the face, but only to that of the hair, neck, and bosoms. While one cannot deny the support of Hadith that indicate that the Prophet’s wives wore khimar, one must realize that they also covered their faces at all times in the presence of non-mahram men.

The group of scholars agree that it is a highly recommended act to cover the face. The scholars also agree that a woman must cover her adornment, yet some scholars argue that this does not include the face.

 



The classic work on Usool al-Hadith by the al-Hafidh Ibn Hajr al-Asqalani. An essential title for anyone serisously interested in learning about Hadith, their chains of tranmission, narrators, and classfications.

 



Shaykh ‘Alee  Hasan ‘Alee ‘Abdulhameed compiled 40 authentic Hadith from those fine sayings of the Messenger of Allah, Sallallahu alaihi Wasallam, to serve as a reminder to all Muslims. They contain guidance on hearts purification, character refinement and soul cultivation towards good…all meant to draw us closer to Islamic Personality in essence, outer manner and appearance.

 



A summarised text detailing the rules governing the Criticism of Hadeeth. From its introduction -‘A hadith (pl. ahadith) is composed of two parts: the matn (text) and the isnad (chain of reporters). A text may seem to be logical and reasonable but it needs an authentic isnad with reliable reporters to be acceptable; ‘Abdullah b. al-Mubarak (d. 181 AH) is reported to have said, “The isnad is part of the religion: had it not been for the isnad, whoever wished to would have said whatever he liked.” During the lifetime of the Prophet (SAS) and after his death, his Companions (Sahabah) used to refer to him when quoting his sayings. The Successors (Tabi’un) followed suit; some of them used to quote the Prophet (SAS) through the Companions while others would omit the intermediate authority – such a hadith was known as mursal (loose). It was found that the missing link between the Successor and the Prophet (SAS) might be one person, i.e. a Companion, or two persons, the extra person being an older Successor who heard the hadith from the Companion.’

 



The following is a collection of 40 Hadith Qudsi. Hadith Qudsi are the sayings of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace and Blessings of Allah be upon him) as revealed to him by the Almighty Allah. Hadith Qudsi (or Sacred Hadith) are so named because, unlike the majority of Hadith which are Prophetic Hadith, their authority (Sanad) is traced back not to the Prophet but to the Almighty. Among the many definitions given by the early scholars to Sacred Hadith is that of as-Sayyid ash-Sharif al-Jurjani (died in 816 A.H.) in his lexicon At-Tarifat where he says: “A Sacred Hadith is, as to the meaning, from Allah the Almighty; as to the wording, it is from the messenger of Allah (peace be upon him). It is that which Allah the Almighty has communicated to His Prophet through revelation or in dream, and he, peace be upon him, has communicated it in his own words. Thus Qur’an is superior to it because, besides being revealed, it is His wording.”

 



This is a Commentary on the abridged form of Imam Tirmidhi’s (209 – 279 AH) famous Shamaa-il, in which he has recorded everything about the Holy Prophet (S.A.W) on the authority of the Companions, and collected 397 ahadith which are devided into 55 Chapters. Drawing A pen picture of the Holy Prophet’s (S.A.W) physical features manners and characteristics.

 



The most famous collection of 40 hadiths of all time is the one collected by Imam Abu Zakariyyah Muhyuddeen Yahya ibnSharaf An-Nawawi who died in AH 676. The collection is known as Al-Arba`ain An-Nawawiah or An-Nawawi’s 40 Hadiths.

These selected forty hadiths comprise the main essential and fundamental concepts of Islam which, in turn, construct the minimum level of required revealed knowledge for every single Muslim.Various principles are contained in these hadiths, such as belief, Muslim ethics and fiqh.The collection of Forty hadith by Imam Nawawi has been known, accepted and appreciated by Muslim scholars for the last seven centuries.

 

 



This is a lecture that Shaikh Al-Albani gave in the city of Doha, the capital of Qatar, during the blessed month of Ramadan of 1392H. Then requesters asked the shaikh to print it due to the important benefits contained within it, and to the Muslim’s need for something like it.

 



This book is a collection of Ahadith Qudsi relating to the important aspects of daily life so that the readers may get benefited from it for the success in this life as well as the hereafter. Original text of the Ahadith in the Arabic language is also given with the English meaning because the translations do not convey the meanings of the original language.

 



This book is a translation of a short treatise entitled Kashf-ul-Kurbah fee wasfi Haali Ahlil-Ghurbah, or Alleviating Grievances in Describing the Condition of the Strangers, written by the great Imaam, Al- Haafidh Zayn-ud-Deen Ibn Rajab Al-Hanbalee, rahimahullaah. In this treatise, Ibn Rajab deals with the topic of the Strangers, or Al-Ghurabaa. He begins by listing the many ahaadeeth reported about them, in which the Messenger of Allaah describes their attributes and explains their position. They are given this name because they will be strange during the Last Days, due to their adherence to the Sunnah and to the Way of the First Muslims, the Salaf As-Saalih. So just as those who first accepted Islaam at the hands of Muhammad (saws) were considered strangers with their families and close ones, then indeed, those who adhere to the Sunnah in the last Days, when innovations and misguidance are rampant and widespread, will also be considered strangers amidst their families and close ones, not to mention the disbelievers.