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Allâh (SWT) chose for accompanying him and taking knowledge from him a people who are the best of this nation, which is itself the best of all nations. Allâh (SWT) honored them by allowing them to ac-company His Prophet (saw). He favored them in this worldly life by giving them the opportunity to see him and hear his hadîth directly from his noble mouth….This is the bounty of Allâh which He bestows upon whom He wills, and Allâh possesses the great-est of bounties. Indeed the Companions conveyed from Allâh’s Messenger (saw) that which he was sent with from guidance in the most complete and perfect form. They will have the greatest of rewards due to their companionship of Allâh’s Messenger (saw), their fighting in Jihâd along his side, and their noble actions in spreading Islâm.’



This Book contains Five of the Compositions by the Author who is also the author of the Popular Men Around the Messenger.



From the day he embraced Islam until the day he died, Abu Bakr As-Siddique (Radhi Allahu Anhu – May Allah be Pleased with Him) was the ideal Muslim, surpassing all other Companions in every sphere of life. During the Prophet’s lifetime, Abu Bakr was an exemplary soldier on the battlefield; upon the Prophet’s death, Abu Bakr (R) remained steadfast and, through the help of Allah, held this nation together. When others suggested keeping Usaamah’s army back, Abu Bakr insisted – and correctly so – that the army should continue the mission which the Prophet (S) had in mind. When people refused to pay Zakaat, and when the apostates threatened the stability of the Muslim nation, Abu Bakr was the one who remained firm and took decisive action against them. These are just some of the examples of Abu Bakr’s many wonderful achievements throughout his life. I have endeavored to describe all of the above in a clear and organized manner. But more so than anything else, I have tried to show how Abu Bakr’s methodology as a Muslim and as a ruler helped establish the foundations of a strong, stable, and prosperous country – one that began in Al-Madeenah, extended throughout the Arabian Peninsula, and then reached far-off lands outside of Arabia.

 



The second caliph of Islam, ‘Umar ibn al-Khattâb faced more struggles than any other Muslim leader in the early onset of Islam. His life began in a time of ignorance and ended during the Golden Age of Islam. Under his leadership, the Muslim world was witnessing some of its most notable conquests in the history of Islam. The strength and resilience of Islam’s leaders were being tested, and ‘Umar ibn al-Khattâb’s true commitment to Allah shone to reveal an Islamic spirit unlike that found in any other Muslim leader. The standards by which he lived can teach us a lot about determination, hardship, and success.

This book was translated into English by Nasiruddin al-Khattab. From the Translator: For those who would be leaders, this book offers the model of an ideal Muslim leader, one who felt responsible before Allah for the well being of all those under his rule, including his troops, women, infants, non-Muslim subjects and even animals. ‘Umar was a ‘hands on’ leader who kept himself informed and consulted scholars and experts before every major decision.For the rest of us, this book offers a window into an exciting and important period of Islamic history, and it also reminds of an important lesson, that our strength comes not from wealth or money or status, but from our submission to Allah and our commitment to the path of Islam.



While reading this book, we cannot help but be moved by the lives of the Companions herein depicted. How we long to have their awe and reverence for Allah! How we long to spend the same hours in worship as they! How we long to be as brave as they were in the face of danger! How we long to be as patient as they were under torture! This book fulfills the need for the English-speaking Muslim to learn more about that first generation of Muslims. Indeed the Companions — the men who were contemporaries with the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) — inspire and encourage us.



That was `Omar ibnul-Khattab, the man of extraordinary strenght, height, broadshoulderedness thickness of hands and feet; the man who forced the people to listen when he spoke, who always hastened away when he walked, and who usually caused much pain when he struck. That was `Omar who never felt scared of anything or anybody throughout his life. It was not strange to see him facing the first Muslims with all the violence and ruthlessness he had. There was a strong enmity between him and Islam; the reason for this was that, among his people, he had been a man full of power prudence zeal and dignity power to defend his people and their beliefs; prudence to be always having watchful care of their interests; zeal to spend his time and effort to keep them in union; and dignity to provide full respect and prestige for himself and his people always and everywhere. With all these honourable qualities, ‘Omar had had to face any call that might have caused disunion among his people, dispersing them, nullifying their aspirations condemning their beliefs and satirizing their gods. No wonder, then, that `Omar’s violence inflicted the severest persecution and torture upon the first Muslims. We have seen how he had inherited so much of his father’s brutal and violent nature. If we bear in mind that the most brutal and merciless enemy of Islam, its Prophet and its first adherents, was `Amr ibn-Hisham, after wards named “Abu-Jahl” by the Prophet and his companions, was `Omar’s uncle (his mother’s brother), we can easily discern that `Omar’s violence was the outcome of what he had inherited from his father, and of the hideous ruthlessness his uncle used to inflict upon the poor and weak Muslims of his time.